Monday, May 09, 2005

Cosmopolitan: The Drink


Well, this would seem to be the drink you were discussing in seminar: the blurb on the page says it all. (Via iVillage.co.uk/ "the website for women."
Wednesday it is ...

7 comments:

Kevin said...

can the lads opt out of fish n' chips if we're allergic to the fish? Should make the pints more interesting

Dr. S.A. Ogden said...

Well, the "lad lunch" is another week anyway, but we'll have a selection -- meat pies for instance beside f'n c. Best advertising slogan ever? "Guinness is good for you!"

Kristen said...

Guinness IS good for you.
Um, about yesterday's lecture...we started talking about relating to Villette or relating to Villett's narrator. I think my relation to the narrator went in and out -- at times I felt close to what she was going through, at other times I felt almost alienated from her experiences. I think this might have to do with the novel's uncanny aspect, that sort of familiar-but-totally-not-familiar-at-the-same-time kind of feeling. The book is dripping with death, death, death, which would likely add to its uncanny sensibilities. So while we might be relating to it at times, we're also pushed away by all the death talk. Good times.
I'd also like to comment on the passive narrator idea. What do we make of the Long Vacation chapter, for example, when the prose is saturated with the narrator's completely depressed and morbid state of mind? Unlike previous chapters which seemed to focus on other characters, this chapter is very internal -- getting directly into the head of the narrator, and the narrator's intimate closeness to death.

Christine said...

I would agree with your analysis of the Long Vacation chapter. Lucy Snow when unnoccupied and unable to comment on others' states of mind seems to fall into a dismal state of mind herself.

I don't know that I completely identify with the narrator, but I do share her perspecive at times. I for one feel like I might fall into a similarily depressive state if I were practicaly isolated in a foreign town with no one for company but myself and an aloof servant. Her state of mind--to me at least--appears to be like cabin fever, like Johnny in Stephen King's the Shining (perhaps not as psycho though).

I have to say, also, that I admire Lucy Snowe for her ability to stay composed in the chapter entitled "The Fete." Ginerva cattily explains that she is a rich, popular, and beautiful coquette while Lucy is a humble, plain, and 'old' school teacher. For me, Lucy's ability to control her temper and not show anger here is both admirable and frustrating. Admireable that she has such patience, but frustrating because Ginerva deserves a good railing. Anywho...those are my thoughts...

Kristen said...

Thanks for the drinks and chocolate! :)

Felix The Cat said...

Poking the fire, although Snowe is reserved in her actions against other women in the text, she still conflicts a great deal with them, if only in her mind, and in these emotions, there is an unquestionable competition between her and the other women (clearly seen during the play) which would attack Darwin's Theory (yeah I'm going to Scientoligist hell I know) Snowe's mind works in circles, wanting escape but wanting to be suppressed, wanting to be alone, but wanting to be loved....

Dr. S.A. Ogden said...

Most welcome for the goodies: thank-you all for an excellent class.